Posted in easy science experiments, Education, preschool, preschool curriculum

Science for kids – fishing for paper clips

Children love science experiments.

The mystery and magic holds even the most busy child captivated.

This little experiment is a nice learning through play idea to teach children about magnets and the metals that attract to them.

Fishing for magnets

You will need

  • Glass or jar ( use a clear plastic container for smaller children)
  • Paper clips
  • Fridge magnet

Method:

Let your child place the magnets into the glass.

Give them the magnet and show them that the paper clips attract to the magnet.

Allow them to continue fishing for paper clips.

You can also turn this into a game by taking turns and see who catches the most at each turn or by giving a group 9f children each a glass and set a timer, who will finish collecting all their paper clips first?

Video

I absolutely loved Hamish’s reaction to this. You can see how he enjoyed catching his paper clip fish in this video.

Why do magnets attract paper clips ?

The magnetic field from a magnet creates a magnetic force, attracting other ferromagnetic materials.

Paper clips are usually made from steel wire. The steel is an alloy of iron and carbon. Iron is a ferromagnetic material and that will make the paper clip attract to the magnet.

I’d love to hear if your children enjoyed this experiment. Let me know in the comments.

Posted in easy science experiments, preschool, preschool curriculum

Preschool science … Fizzy lemons

We had so much fun with just these two ingredients this morning ….

Hamish and I decided to start the week with an easy science experiment and we made some fizzing lemons.

The bicarb, which is the base, mixes with the lemon, which is a acid, it starts a bubbling reaction, which is carbon dioxide that is fun to watch.

To make your own:

You need –

  • Lemon
  • Bicarb
  • Food colouring ( optional)

Method

Cut your lemon in half.
( I poked mine with a knife and squeezed it a bit so the lemon juice was quite oozy)

If you are using food colouring add a drop or two to the lemon.

Put 2 or 3 spoons of bicarb onto the lemon.

It should start to react straight away.

Just like magic!

Posted in easy science experiments, preschool, preschool curriculum, STEM

Fun science – changing a flowers colour

One of my favourite activities as a child was to pick my mothers flowers and try change their colour by leaving them in food colouring water.Tonight as I glanced over at the flowers I bought before lockdown I decided it was the perfect time to show Hamish this ” magic” trick.And so we grabbed some glasses, water, food colouring and 2 flowers and set our experiment up.Eager little hands were ready to help me and are still learning to do things slowly.As he poured the blue food colouring he managed to splosh it all over the counter. ( thank goodness for jick)So, when pouring the red, he was so much more gentle and deliberate.After we had coloured the water, he placed one flower in each glass and we have left them overnight.I cant wait to see his reaction in the morning.It takes 24 hours for the flowers to completely change colour and you normally use a plain white flower, so I’m not too certain how vibrant the shades will appear on our slightly greenish flowers.This morning our flowers had absorbed enough food colouring to change colour already.The longer we leave them the more vibrant the colour will appear.

How this works

Plants absorb water from the roots. This water travels up the stems into the flower petals.Although the cut flowers we use no longer have roots, they still absorb water up their stems through a process called capillary action.As the water is coloured with the food colouring, the dye enters the flowers petals and stains them to change colour.What is most interesting is that you need to leave each flower in dyed water to keep the colour as plain water would make the vibrant shades of the petals fade.