Posted in babies, Parenting

7 Trending baby names for 2022

As is customary, each year brings a new season of fashion, food, outrageous Tiktok trends, and baby names.

I decided to take a look at the popular baby name website, Nameberry to see what their predictions are for 2022.

Defining trends

It was interesting to see that they have identified 7 major trends that will influence baby names in the coming year.
these are:-
  • Playful names
  • Bridgerton inspired names
  • Names with the letter R
  • Names that give a feeling of retro nostalgia
  •  Euro Chic names
  • Names ending in an S
  • Names inspired by nature
Nameberry make their predictions based on American social security administration, user behaviour on their website, current events, pop culture, and several other defining factors including categories from TV, music, nature, letters, and sounds.
So, if you are expecting take a look at these name suggestions.

Baby Name Suggestions for 2022

1. Playful
It is believed that after the harsh pandemic months many parents may want to lighten the air and will choose playful names like Birdie or Pixi
Other suggestions are
Bear
Dovie
And iggy
2.Bridgerton – inspired names
It seems the ever-popular Netflix Regency Era novel adaptation – Bridgerton has proved extremely popular among future parents with name choices like :
Francesca
Benedict
Cressida
Eloise
And Daphne
3. The letter R 
Short names that are powerful in their simplicity and strength will appeal to the parents of 2022
There has already been quite a trend of short unisex names starting with R,  mostly as middle names.
Names like
Reeve
Revel
Reign
Roux
And Rome
4. Retro nostalgia
Much of the time what is old becomes new again and many retro names evoking happier, simpler times are making a huge comeback this year.
Old names like
Betty
Bobby
Mae
Ned
And Nellie
5. Euro chic
Euro chic baby names appeal to the sophisticated worldwide traveler and would be comfortable anywhere from Copenhagen to Cape Town
Chic names like
Astrid
Bastian
Cosmo
Oona
And Stellen
6. Names ending in S
Names that end in S are quite rare and Nameberry predicts a change in this for both boys and girls.
Some examples are
Emrys
Lois
Wells
And Ozias
7.Nature
With the pandemic keeping us all indoors for most of the year, it is predicted that many a wanderlust parents will draw inspiration from nature and use names like
Horizon
Koa
Lotus
Prairie
And wood
Which is your favourite from the lists above?
Posted in Parenting, pregnancy

Hypnobirthing -What you need to know

When you are pregnant, one of the first things you will need to think about is when and how you will be giving birth.

From your first antenatal visit you will be given valuable information on how your pregnancy will progress, the first signs of labour, what to do when you are in labour and the many birthing options you can choose, in order to keep you and your baby healthy throughout your pregnancy.

You may also be given a list of pain management options, one of which is hypnobirthing.

What is Hypnobirthing?

Hypnobirthing, in short, is an educational program that uses breathing techniques and relaxation to teach self hypnosis to enhance your birthing experience and provide effective, mindful pain relief without  the need for medication.

Many women who have used the hypnobirthing techniques advocate for them as they have been able to breathe effectively through contractions and have been able to avoid interventions. Hypnobirthing also allows a woman to fight the fear of childbirth, releasing emotions of joy and happiness rather than those of pain and anxiety. Taking this into consideration, it is easy to see why hypnobirthing is growing in popularity.

Putting mom in control

When it comes to labour and birth, many new moms often feel like they are not in control and may feel almost detached from the experience.

For nine months she has carried a baby, adjusted as this new life has changed her body without warning and then in her antenatal classes she has focused primarily on delivery for the new baby and how to manage the pain, without much thought to how the new mother can embrace giving birth. in contrast, hypnobirthing, teaches the new mom how to take control and be in charge of events during birth.

Hypnobirthing is also highly recommended for women who have experienced a negative or traumatic birthing experience. This allows them to feel more in control, allowing them to release any negativity or anxiety that pain medication cannot illiminate.

How does hypnobirthing work?

When you sign up for a hypnobirthing course , the content covered will often include aspects of labour and delivery that may not be covered in a more traditional antenatal course.

Topics such as:

  • Breathing techniques
  • How to reduce the need for pain relief and medication
  • How to reduce the need for intervention such as an episiotomy
  • Learning how to feel empowered throughout your delivery and in control
  • Learning how to have confidence and how to speak with knowledge to the medical team in a hospital setting
  • Dispelling the fear around childbirth
  • Learning to stay positive

Hypnobirthing uses self hypnosis and relaxation techniques to reduce the pain of contractions and aid in a positive and safe delivery at birth. Hypnobirthing aids in teaching a woman to have confidence in her bodies natural ability to give birth and relaxes her body and mind to a place of welcoming contractions and embracing the process of giving birth.

The benefits of hypnobirthing

There are numerous benefits to a mother using hypnobirthing during labour and delivery.

  • A shorter labour
  • Less risk for surgical or other intervention
  • More success in turning a breech baby
  • A more positive birthing experience
  • Emotions of elation after birth
  • Retaining the learned techniques for later births
  • Feeling empowered to choose a birthing option, type of birth and setting
  • Being in control of their body
  • Being more present during the delivery and enjoying the birth
  • Using the relaxation techniques at any stage, not just during labour and delivery

Although during childbirth nothing is ever assumed or guaranteed and a complication may arise leaving a mother needing an intervention or added pain relief, hypnobirthing does however equip you with the skills you need to have the calmest, most positive birthing experience.

The benefits of hypnobirthing for baby

We all know that a calm birth allows a baby to enter the world calmly and hypnobirthing assists to keep mom calm resulting in a calm, positive environment for a happy calm baby to be welcomed into.

The absence of pain relief also means that the baby is more alert and able to feed faster and more efficiently. Studies have shown that APGAR  scores for a baby  delivered without medication are higher as well.

My experience

Whilst I personally, have never attended a hypnobirthing class, I have had 7 vaginal births, 6 of which were without the need for pain medication because I used breathing techniques learned. One of the biggest factors in me deciding to go “drug free: was because of how not in control I felt in my first pregnancy.

With the birth of my second child I felt more in control before, during and after labour. Emotionally I was able to attach and bond to my child faster and able to get out of bed sooner to attend to him better.

With my third child, I was able to breathe through not pushing as the midwife removed the cord from around his neck during birth and with my fourth I delivered him alone, unafraid and in control thanks to my breathing techniques.

When I went into labour with my fifth child, I was taken to the hospital by a work collegue of my husband and emotionally I was increadibly anxious. By breathing and focusing on the birth, I was able to calm my own anxiety, manage the contraction pain and deliver a happy baby a few minutes after arriving at the hospital.

With my sixth child, I was able to remain calm as I found myself 10cm dialed and she had not yet descended. With controlled breathing I was able to stay focus and work with my mid wife to deliver her safely and with my youngest child I was able to correctly assess my own body to know when I was in labour after a very long and prolonged induced labour.

So, whilst doing research for this article, I was able to resonate with the moms who had chosen hypnobirthing as an option.

Conclusion

Giving birth should be a positive experience and which ever option you choose it should suit you. Empower yourself with the knowledge needed to make the right decision for you and your baby.

Posted in Parenting

MSD for Mothers launches a vital new programme to help end maternal death

Maternal deaths are often avoidable.

Following the successful implementation of an emergency workers’ training programme by the Foundation for Professional Development, MSD for Mothers has awarded a second grant to South Africa to the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Pretoria – this time for the training of nurses in 2019.
Following the successful implementation of an emergency workers’ training programme by the Foundation for Professional Development, MSD for Mothers has awarded a second grant to South Africa to the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Pretoria – this time for the training of nurses in 2019.

Childbirth should be a joyous experience for the millions of mothers bringing life into the world every day. Sadly, for many women in South Africa it is a tragedy.1

“Despite significant progress made over the past few years, South Africa’s maternal mortality figures remain very high at 116.9 per 100 000,” says Sunet Jordaan, Project Manager, FPD – MSD for Mothers. Neonatal mortality rates are also unacceptably high at 9.9 per 1 000. It is estimated that 40% of all maternal deaths are avoidable and related to community, administrative and clinical factors.”2

Jordaan says lack of ante-natal care, being pregnant when older than 35 or younger than 18, and inadequate and delayed transport to clinics and hospitals during distressed labour increases the risk of maternal mortality. “Another major concern is the number of babies born before arriving at a health facility, which constitutes 6.33% of all births. The WHO target is 1.5% of all births, as birth before arrival increases the risks of neonatal mortality,” she adds.

“Another major concern is the number of babies born before arriving at a health facility, which constitutes 6.33% of all births. The WHO target is 1.5% of all births, as birth before arrival increases the risks of neonatal mortality,” she adds.

MSD for Mothers

MSD for Mothers has established a 10-year, $500 million global initiative to create a world where no woman dies giving life. In South Africa, MSD provided funding for the Foundation for Professional Development (FPD), a non-governmental organisation, to implement an Obstetric Emergencies Training Programme to improve maternal and infant survival by raising the quality of emergency care for pregnant mothers and new born babies as they are transported by ambulance to health facilities. The programme is endorsed by the National Department of Health (NDoH)
“The training of healthcare workers, specifically on the Essential Steps in Managing Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE) helps to reduce maternal deaths specifically related to obstetric haemorrhage, pregnancy related infections and complications of hypertension,” says Jordaan. “Research has shown that emergency drills, as conducted during ESMOE training, reduce maternal mortality in South Africa”.

In South Africa, MSD provided funding for the Foundation for Professional Development (FPD), a non-governmental organisation, to implement an Obstetric Emergencies Training Programme to improve maternal and infant survival by raising the quality of emergency care for pregnant mothers and new born babies as they are transported by ambulance to health facilities. The programme is endorsed by the National Department of Health (NDoH)
“The training of healthcare workers, specifically on the Essential Steps in Managing Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE) helps to reduce maternal deaths specifically related to obstetric haemorrhage, pregnancy related infections and complications of hypertension,” says Jordaan. “Research has shown that emergency drills, as conducted during ESMOE training, reduce maternal mortality in South Africa”.

How the current MSD for Mothers programme works

Under the leadership of the FPD, the MSD for MothersObstetric Emergencies in South Africa programme is working to improve maternal and infant survival by improving the quality of emergency care provided to pregnant mothers and new-borns during ambulance transit between health facilities. The project focuses on five health districts:
Capricorn (Limpopo), Amathole (Eastern Cape) Nkangala, Enhlanzeni and Gert Sibande (Mpumalanga).

The project focuses on five health districts:
Capricorn (Limpopo), Amathole (Eastern Cape) Nkangala, Enhlanzeni and Gert Sibande (Mpumalanga).

“We anticipate that training and capacity building of EMS staff will enable them to better manage obstetric emergencies in transit and reduce the number of women dying from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth,” says Jordaan. “The completed work has significant potential to have an immediate impact on maternal and perinatal deaths in South Africa and will directly contribute to the NDoH’s longer-term strategy to strengthen obstetric EMS systems.”

The new MSD for Mothers programme launches in 2019

In an unprecedented move, MSD for Mothers awarded a second grant to South Africa for 2019. New grant holder the Faculty of Health Sciences at University of Pretoria will take over the reins from FPD and will implement CLEVER, which shifts the focus onto nursing staff. The intervention will better equip nursing staff to deal with maternal distress and improve the quality of care in midwife-led obstetric units and district hospitals.

Like its predecessor, CLEVER aims to reduce maternal deaths, as well as stillbirths and the death of new-borns in their first week of life, and to improve the overall experience of birthing care for mothers – all while using existing resources.
The intervention will better equip nursing staff to deal with maternal distress and improve the quality of care in midwife-led obstetric units and district hospitals.

Like its predecessor, CLEVER aims to reduce maternal deaths, as well as stillbirths and the death of new-borns in their first week of life, and to improve the overall experience of birthing care for mothers – all while using existing resources.

The term CLEVER stands for:

  • Clinical care

  • Labour ward management

  • Eliminate barriers

  • Verify care

  • Emergency obstetric simulation training

  • Respectful care

“The ‘Working CLEVER’ package was developed to re-organise the way in which obstetric care is provided at district level and to support and mentor midwives and other clinical staff to render high-quality, respectful obstetric care,” says Cathy Bezuidenhout, Project Manager, Research Centre for Maternal, Foetal, New-born & Child Health Care Strategies, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria.

The intervention will also be rolled out to other districts in the country, with the focus on empowering local clinicians.

CLEVER focuses on delivering high-quality maternity care at primary care facilities in South Africa, and to create a positive and happy childbirth experience,” Bezuidenhout adds. “We are excited about this important and much-needed programme and the impact it can have on saving the lives of women and new-borns. No woman should die in childbirth.”

References:

1. Saving Mothers 2014-2016: Seventh triennial report on confidential enquiries into maternal deaths in South Africa. Department of Health. 2018.

2. District Health Barometer. [Internet] Massyn N, Padarath A, Peer N, Day C, editors. District Health Barometer 2016/17. Durban: Health Systems Trust. 2017. Available from:

http://www.hst.org.za/publications/Pages/District-Health-Barometer-201617.aspx

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